Henley Street Pub Walk

Pub Walk from the Cock Inn Henley Street

No 15 from Pub Walks in Kent by David Handcock

The Cock Inn (photo) is a ‘˜traditional’ pub in every sense of the word and a mecca for both real ale and scrumpy cider enthusiasts. Located on a country lane in a tiny hamlet, it has been a pub since the early 1700’s and prior to this the building was believed to be a farmhouse. Landlord Andrew Turner has been at the helm here since 1984, but only since 1991 when he bought the property from Allied – has he been free to develop this unassuming pub into a classic ale house and into what Camra describe as ‘A shining example of how a pub should be run’.

Cock Inn -Small

The Cock Inn

A constantly changing selection of between 10 and 14 real ales are tapped straight from the cask behind the bar and during 1992 over 170 different brews were featured here. The countrywide choice can include Burton Ale, Youngs Special, Shepherd Neame Spitfire, Adnams Bitter, Marstons Pedigree, Green King Abbot Ale and Theakston XB. During the summer four scrumpy ciders can be sampled – Addlestones, Sepham Farm from Kent and Bromells and Grays Farm cider from Devon.

The two unpretentious bars are welcoming, free from music and gaming machines. The simply furnished public bar has a woodburner, a bar billiards table, a few local prints and a collection of Dinky toy cars. The comfortable lounge bar has a splendid warming log fire, wall bench seating set within the large bay window.

The traditional ambience and atmosphere of a pub in bygone days is maintained in the limited and simple, yet hearty bar snacks on offer. The choice is straightforward; either fresh bread and extra mature cheddar served with pickles, toasted cheese and onion, cheese and tomato or cheese and ham sandwiches and during the winter a bowl of hot soup with bread. In addition, at weekends during the summer a variety of barbeque dishes are available, which can be enjoyed in rear garden and terrace. Food is served from 12 noon till 2pm and from 5pm till 8pm, (Saturdays from 12 noon till 8pm).

Weekday opening times are from 12 noon till 2.30pm and from 5pm till 11pm (Saturdays from 12 noon till 11pm).

Dogs are welcome inside, but children are not allowed in the bars.

Telephone: (0474) 814208.

The hamlet is signposted from Sole Street, off the lane between Cobham and Meopham near Gravesend.

Approx. distance of walk: 5 miles. O.S. Map No. 177 TQ 664/672

The inn has a large car park.

An undulating and varied walk along field paths, across farmland and pasture and through peaceful woodland on wide, muddy tracks. Well waymarked, easy to follow and very scenic. Owletts (NT) at Cobham, a fine red-brick Charles II house is worth a visit (open April to September, Wednesday and Thursday only).

From the pub turn right along the lane, pass the Old Post Office (now a cottage named that) and turn right over stile (path 188), Waymarked Luddesdown Church. Head uphill on a defined path, cross
stile, pass through a narrow thicket and continue across an open field on a worn path towards the church. Pass a hall with a belfry on the left to a lane. Turn left then right onto a tarmac track, signed to the church, then just before large wooden gates and barn, turn left onto an arrowed path (214)
down to a stile. Keep ahead along the field edge to a stile and climb uphill between trees to an open field and a junction of paths. Turn right and follow the field edge to a lane.

1 Cross over onto a waymarked track opposite and continue climbing through woodland. Follow yellow arrow, remain on the main track at the top, then at an arrowed gatepost and junction of paths proceed with yellow arrow along the muddy track. At a fork, keep right, then bear left just before two pylons and follow the track through the woodland fringe to an arrowed post where another footpath crosses. Turn right her onto a narrow path downhill past a cottage to a lane. Turn left, then immediately right onto the path beside ‘Thatched Cottage’ to a further lane.

3. Turn left, pass Great Buckland Farm and cross a stile on the right into pasture (photo).

Cross the field to another stile then follow the track uphill to a stile preceeding woodland. Climb steeply up a stepped path to a stile, then bear slightly left across a paddock and go through a gate, shortly reaching a lane. Turn right, then where the lane bears left beside a black and white timbered
cottage (photo), continue ahead along a tarmal drive between the cottage and a barn.

Tarmac soon gives way to grass, enter woodland and descend on a well waymarked path to a stile. Proceed ahead across pasture to a stile and cross a driveway onto a narrow, pathway beside the field which goes steeply up to a lane.

The Cock Inn

A constantly changing selection of between 10 and 14 real ales are tapped straight from the cask behind the bar and during 1992 over 170 different brews were featured here. The countrywide choice can include Burton Ale, Youngs Special, Shepherd Neame Spitfire, Adnams Bitter, Marstons Pedigree, Green King Abbot Ale and Theakston XB. During the summer four scrumpy ciders can be sampled – Addlestones, Sepham Farm from Kent and Bromells and Grays Farm cider from Devon.

The two unpretentious bars are welcoming, free from music and gaming machines. The simply furnished public bar has a woodburner, a bar billiards table, a few local prints and a collection of Dinky toy cars. The comfortable lounge bar has a splendid warming log fire, wall bench seating set within the large bay window.

The traditional ambience and atmosphere of a pub in bygone days is maintained in the limited and simple, yet hearty bar snacks on offer. The choice is straightforward; either fresh bread and extra mature cheddar served with pickles, toasted cheese and onion, cheese and tomato or cheese and ham sandwiches and during the winter a bowl of hot soup with bread. In addition, at weekends during the summer a variety of barbeque dishes are available, which can be enjoyed in rear garden and terrace. Food is served from 12 noon till 2pm and from 5pm till 8pm, (Saturdays from 12 noon till 8pm).

Weekday opening times are from 12 noon till 2.30pm and from 5pm till 11pm (Saturdays from 12 noon till 11pm).

Dogs are welcome inside, but children are not allowed in the bars.

Telephone: (0474) 814208.

The hamlet is signposted from Sole Street, off the lane between Cobham and Meopham near Gravesend.

Approx. distance of walk: 5 miles. O.S. Map No. 177 TQ 664/672

The inn has a large car park.

An undulating and varied walk along field paths, across farmland and pasture and through peaceful woodland on wide, muddy tracks. Well waymarked, easy to follow and very scenic. Owletts (NT) at Cobham, a fine red-brick Charles II house is worth a visit (open April to September, Wednesday and Thursday only).

From the pub turn right along the lane, pass the Old Post Office (now a cottage named that) and turn right over stile (path 188), Waymarked Luddesdown Church. Head uphill on a defined path, cross
stile, pass through a narrow thicket and continue across an open field on a worn path towards the church. Pass a hall with a belfry on the left to a lane. Turn left then right onto a tarmac track, signed to the church, then just before large wooden gates and barn, turn left onto an arrowed path (214)
down to a stile. Keep ahead along the field edge to a stile and climb uphill between trees to an open field and a junction of paths. Turn right and follow the field edge to a lane.

1 Cross over onto a waymarked track opposite and continue climbing through woodland. Follow yellow arrow, remain on the main track at the top, then at an arrowed gatepost and junction of paths proceed with yellow arrow along the muddy track. At a fork, keep right, then bear left just before two pylons and follow the track through the woodland fringe to an arrowed post where another footpath crosses. Turn right her onto a narrow path downhill past a cottage to a lane. Turn left, then immediately right onto the path beside ‘Thatched Cottage’ to a further lane.

3. Turn left, pass Great Buckland Farm and cross a stile on the right into pasture (photo).

Cross the field to another stile then follow the track uphill to a stile preceeding woodland. Climb steeply up a stepped path to a stile, then bear slightly left across a paddock and go through a gate, shortly reaching a lane. Turn right, then where the lane bears left beside a black and white timbered
cottage (photo), continue ahead along a tarmal drive between the cottage and a barn.

Tarmac soon gives way to grass, enter woodland and descend on a well waymarked path to a stile. Proceed ahead across pasture to a stile and cross a driveway onto a narrow, pathway beside the field which goes steeply up to a lane.

Farm Pasture - Small

Great Buckland Farm Pasture

Timbered Cottage - Small

Timbered Cottage

4. Turn slightly right and cross the lane onto a waymarked fenced bridleway, head uphill and shortly climb the stile on your right into an open field. Keep straight ahead on the left most of two worn paths, descend and pass through a scrub hedge on the field edge then proceed through the next field to a lane. Cross the lane to a stile opposite, waymarked Sol Street and Henley Street, keep left-handed to a further stile, then bear half-right to a stile on the woodland edge. Pass through
the wood, then follow a grassy path on the field edge to a T-junction of paths. Turn left
then immediately right onto a path at the edge of the field then at the end of the field follow a path that gently descends to the lane in Henley Street. Turn left back to pub.

map

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *